Showing posts with label wikipedia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label wikipedia. Show all posts

Monday, October 7, 2013

GM Cabbage with Scorpion Poison Coming Soon

English: Real scorpion wine on sale, in Taipei...English: Real scorpion wine on sale, in Taipei 中文: 蝎子酒,台北 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Get ready for genetically engineered cabbages that come complete with their own scorpion poison, just for you to eat. It's touted as requiring less pesticide use and being, of course, completely safe. Close investigation, though, indicates that neither claim is likely true.


acefinance posted: "Agribusiness is in a mad rush to take over the earth, and seems willing to stop at nothing. Coming soon is cabbage with scorpion poison engineered in every cell. Of course, they claim it's safe and will result in less pesticide use, but history and logic "

New post on Ace Food & Health News

acefinance:
Agribusiness is in a mad rush to take over the earth, and seems willing to stop at nothing. Coming soon is cabbage with scorpion poison engineered in every cell. Of course, they claim it's safe and will result in less pesticide use, but history and logic say otherwise. Who will wake from the insane mating between Agribiz and GMOs?

Alacrán, scorpion
Alacrán, scorpion (Photo credit: Wikipedia)



Get ready for genetically engineered cabbages that come complete with their own scorpion poison, just for you to eat. It's touted as requiring less pesticide use and being, of course, completely safe. Close investigation, though, indicates that neither claim is likely true.

A pesticide made with scorpion poison genetically engineered into a virus was first tested back in 1994. Interestingly, the scientists who sprayed the test field wore full body suits to protect them from this "harmless" poison. One must wonder at just how safe it could be when the developers themselves don't trust it more than that! Of course, the head of the trial, Professor David Bishop, insisted that the trial was safe—though he himself opted to take a vacation, rather than be there for it.

In the newer incarnation of scorpion poison genetic engineering, genes from the scorpion, Androctonus australus hector, for production of poison are being genetically engineered into cabbages. The goal is to produce them for public consumption. With the FDA's history of rubberstamp approvals for genetically modified crops, it seems unlikely that anything will interfere with their production and entry into a supermarket near you.


Related articles

acefinance | July 28, 2013 at 7:46 pm | Categories: Ace Food News, Ace Health News, Ace News Desk, Uncategorized | URL: http://wp.me/p2QGMH-4s
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Monday, September 24, 2012

Mrs Alma McKee: Cook To Royalty:Recipe of the Day

Mrs Alma McKee: Cook to the Royal Family:Chateaubriand A La Rosenbad:

When researching this lady l found that not even Wikipedia has any pages and she was a cook for the royal Family in the 1950's and 60's and her book from which l took today's recipe called simply " The Royal Cookbook in Colour by Mrs Mckee."

Anyway this recipe along with others l will post are unusual to say the least but this one was served to the late King Frederick of Denmark, on his visit in 1951.

RECIPE: Chateaubriand A La Rosenbad:
To Serve 4:
Ingredients:
3 ozs/90g butter:
Half a tablespoon of oil:
4 slices of Chateaubriand steak:
For the Sauce:
1 tablespoon brandy:
3 fl ozs/8 cl sherry:
1 pint/15 cl beef gravy:
2 tablespoons of liver pate:
1 oz/3 g butter:
Dash of Worcester sauce:
4 truffles sliced and the juice from the tin:

Quotation: At the time of the serving of the dish:

"Mrs Mckee served this dish to the late King Frederick of Denmark when he paid a state visit in 1951. He was such a charming man that everyone was anxious to see him enjoy his visit in every possible way.I can remember Prince Phillip coming into the kitchen before his visit and discussing the food.I always enjoyed the Prince Phillips informed visit's.He would look into the saucepans,ask questions and crack some very good jokes.In the times of stress and kitchen crisis,he was a real morale booster.I appreciated the informality of these visits because normally a royal visit to the kitchen was preceded by a warning from above,which made us feel we were in for a sort of kit inspection.Prince Phillip however,would appear without warning and take us as we where."

Food Preparation:
First,put the butter and the oil in the frying pan.When hot and golden brown add the steaks and fry on both sides,basting a little.Cook for four to five minutes(underdone)or seven to eight minutes(medium),basting when necessary.Remove from the pan,reserving the juices for the sauce,and keep hot.
To make the sauce,pour the brandy into the clean pan.Heat and set alight,then pour in the sherry to extinguish the flame.Add the beef gravy and the gravy from the steaks and boil for a few minutes.Add the liver pat'e,the butter,Worcester sauce and juice from the truffles.
Season to taste.
Stir well,bring to the boil and strain the sauce over the Chateaubriand.
Garnish each steak with a slice of truffle.Serve with crisp fried potatoes and salad.                  
       
The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly.

Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News Views

Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Sunday, September 23, 2012

Abundance:Quote of the Day:D.H Lawrence:

D H Lawrence born:David Herbert Richards Lawrence 
(11th September,1885 - 2nd March,1930)
An English poet,novelist,playwright,essayist,literary critic and painter,who published as D H Lawrence.His collective works reflected upon the dehumanising affects of modernity and industrialisation.In them,Lawrence confronts issues relating to emotional,health and vitality,spontaneity and instinct.

Lawrence's opinions earned him many enemies and he endured official persecution,censorship and misrepresentation of his creative work throughout the second part of his life,much of which is spent in voluntary exile which he called his "savage pilgrimage." Even though after his death he is now thought of in many circles as "a imaginative novelist of our generation and a visionary thinker" of his time.

QUOTATION:
"The near end of the street was rather dark and had mostly vegetable shops.Abundance of vegetables -piles of white and green fennel,like celery and great sheaves of young,purplish,sea-dust-coloured artichokes...long strings of dried figs,mountains of big oranges,scarlet large peppers,a large slice of pumpkin,a great mass of colours and vegetable freshness....."                          
 

The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly.

Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News and Views

Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Thursday, September 20, 2012

A Kind of Temple:Quote of the Day:William Makepeace Thackeray

WILLIAM MAKEPEACE THACKERAY:(18 July 1811 - 24 December 1863) was an English novelist of the 19th century.He was famous for his satirical works,particularly "Vanity Fair"a panoramic portrait of English society.

Thackeray,an only child,was born in Calcutta,India,where his father,Richmond Thackeray (1 September 1781 - 13 September 1815) was secretary,to the board of revenue in the British East India Company.

QUOTATION:
" Sir,Respect Your Dinner: idolise it,enjoy it properly. You will be many hours of the week,many weeks in the year and many years in your life happier if you do."                  

The posts l provide are my views of good recipes,quotations and articles and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly.

Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News and Views

Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Simply Delicious:Quote of the Day:Giuseppe Lampedusa

Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa:(December 23,1896 - July 23,1957)
He is most famous for his one and only "novel" Gatapardo-(first published posthumously in 1958 and translated as the Leopard),which is set in Sicily during the Risorgimento.
Tomasi as he was known was born in Palermo to Giulio Maria Tomasi,Prince of Lampedusa and Duke of Palma di Montechiario and Beatrice Mastrogiovanni Tasca di Cuto.He became an only child after the death(from (diptheria) of his sister.As a boy he preferred solitude and things to that of people, spending a lot of his time reading and meditating.

Quotation:
"Huge blond babas,Mont Blancs snowy with whipped cream,cakes speckled with white almonds and green pistachios nuts,hillocks of chocolate-covered pastry...."   
            
The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly.

Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News and Views

Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Sunday, September 16, 2012

With Abandon:Quote of the Day:Harriet Van Horne

Harriet Van Horne:{1920-1998) Born in Syracuse,NewYork and graduated from the " College for Women of the University of Rochester in 1940.She was a syndicated journalist appearing in the "New York Post" and other newspapers around the country.In 1960 she covered the "Nixon-Kennedy Debates" as a critic for the "Scripps-Howard" newspaper chain.Her work landed her the " master list of the Nixon political opponents."
During her life Van Horne had to deal with prevailing sexism against female journalists.As Ray Erwin of "Editor and Publisher" described her as a "dainty,blue-eyed blonde with a sweet-voiced feminine manner-and a harpoon in her typewriter.In 1927 she published the essay collection"Never Go Anywhere Without a Pencil."
Van Horne like the reality of TV and not the Universal cowboy and cop nonsense,saying imagine reviewing I Love Lucy 20 times or Gunsmoke 10 times.Van Horne continued writing her newspaper column up and until her death, eventually replacing reviews with any random subject that crossed her mind.While her columns remained popular with readers,few newspapers carried them due to the impossibility of categorization.

QUOTATION: Courtesy of: Harriet Van Horne and published in October 1956 by Vogue:
"Cooking is like love.It should be entered into with abandon or not at all" 
                         
The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly.

Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News and Views

Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Saturday, September 15, 2012

Make Memorable Meals:Quote of the Day:Grimod De La Reyniere

Grimod de La Reynie`re (1758-1837) known as Alexandre Balthazar Laurent Grimod de La Reyniere 
A lover of food and good wines Grimod trained as lawyer gaining fame during the reign of Napoleon,for his gastronomic lifestyle.

Though his father had built a stylish house in Paris with a garden that overlooked the bosquets of the   Champs-Elysee's and kept a great table,the younger Grimod had been born with deformed hands was kept out of sight,a circumstance that developed his biting wit and dark sense of humor.
Upon returning from his studies in Lausanne he collaborated in the Journal des theatres in 1777-78, continuing to write reviews of the theatre some of which he published himself.
During his parents absence he gave grand dinner parties in the Hotel Grimod de la Reyniere at one at which his father returned suddenly, to find a pig dressed up and residing at the table.
The story made its rounds in Paris and a breach with the family ensued,which culminated in a                  lettre de catchet that disinherited him and confined him to a abbey close to Nancy,where at the table of the father abbot he began to learn the art of good eating.
He was a correspondent to the scandal chronicle,Correspondence secrete politique et litteraire (1790) relating  to Paris during the reign of Louis XVl and formed a liaison with the actress Adele Feuchere,who bore their love child in 1790.
Supported with very little money from his family,he had the idea of buying food directly from the producer,and selling it in a store at a set price,to make a living he opened a shop ion Lyon selling groceries,tools and other exotic commodities.When he gained his liberty on the death of his father in 1792,he returned to Paris and spread the activities of his "societe Grimod et Cie," opening stores in other french cities.
He reconciled with his mother,who was saved from the guillotine through his connections,and began a series of mock funeral dinners.

At the first public critic cooking,the first reviewer of the ambitious restaurants that cropped up in Paris in the late eighteenth century and flowered under the Napoleonic regime,his name is a by-word on par with Brillat-Savarin" and an equally rich source of quotations in "French Gastronomic" literature, through the eight volumes of his annual "La Almanach des gourmands"which he edited and published from 1803-12 inclusive.
Even though the Gourmand still retained its sense of "gluttony" on of the "Seven deadly Sins" and Grimod's choice of the word  when "friand"usually connoted a connoisseur of fine food and wine,was a conscious one and wholly in character;gourmand and gourmet,first achieved their modern connotations in Grimod`s Almanachs,which among other where the first "restaurant guides."
The success of the Almanachs encouraged Grimod to bring out the monthly                                         "Journal des Gourmandes et des Belles" which appeared for the first time in 1806.The editorial board met weekly at the " Hotel Grimod del La Reyniere"those "Diners du Vaudiville" composed of dishes sent round by the Premier restaurants of Paris for judgement, by Grimod as host and presiding genius.
His "Manuel des Amphitryons"("hosts") appeared in 1808.Whereby "Sainte-Beuve" called him the
"Father of the Table"

So this seemed to be an apt quote from such a man who brought about such changes in French cuisine terms of reference:
QUOTATION:
"Life is so brief we should not glance either to far backwards and forwards...therefore study how to fix our happiness in our glass and in our plate.

He inherited the family fortune at the death of his mother in 1812,married his devoted mistress, gave his own funeral to see who would come then retired to the Chateau de Villiers-ser-Orge,near Paris.                                    
                             
The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly.

Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News & Views

Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Thursday, September 13, 2012

Make Memorable Meals:Quote of the Day:Robert Carrier

Robert Carrier McMahon: known to us as Robert Carrier: Chef (1923-2006)
Born in Tarrytown, New York was an American Chef,Restaurateur and cookery writer. After his parents went bankrupt in the 1930's Great Depression,they maintained their lifestyle,through removing their servants and preparing their own elaborate dinner parties.Having toured Europe as an actor the young Carrier eventually returned to America and often stayed with his French grandmother,in upstate New York and she taught him to cook,making biscuits and butter-frying fish caught in a nearby stream.      

He eventually moved to England permanently where he became based from 1953-1984 and then until 1994 where he gain his reputation, until his death.

Quote:
"I used to love the way everyone talked about food as if it were one of the most important things in life.
And of course,it is.Without it we would die.Each of us eats about one thousand meals each year.
It is my believe that we should try and make as many of these meals as we can truly memorable."

The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly.

Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News and Views

Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Monday, September 10, 2012

Recipe of the Day:Cumberland Sauce

Cumberland Sauce:Courtesy of Michel Roux:
The sauce miraculously enhances the character of meats and terrines.Serve with galantines and ballontines,pork pies or any cold poultry or game.The sauce tastes even better the day after it is made.

Serves 4:
Preparation: Time 10 Minutes:
Cooking:Time 20 Minutes

Ingredients:
1 Medium Shallot,Finely Chopped:
4 Tablespoons of Wine Vinegar,preferably red:
12 White Pepper Corns,Crushed:
100 ML Veal Stock:
50 ML Ruby Port:
2 Tablespoons Red-Currant Jelly:
1 Tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce:
Juice of 1 Orange:
Zest of 1 Lemon,Blanched and cut into Julienne:
Salt:{to taste}

Method:
Combine the shallot,vinegar and peppercorns in a small saucepan and reduce by over two thirds over a high heat.Add the veal stock,port,redcurrant jelly,Worcestershire sauce and orange juice,quickly bring to the boil then lower the heat and simmer gently for 20 minutes.Season with salt.
Pass the sauce through a conical strainer into a bowl,cool,then refrigerate,as the sauce should be served very cold.
Just before serving serving,stir in the lemon zest.

Chef says:
I have cooked this versatile sauce many times myself and it is delicious! Give it a try and let me know?                                  

The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly.

Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News & Views

Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Memories of Childhood:Quote of the day:Marcel Proust

Marcel Proust:known as {Valentin Louis Georges Eugène Marcel Proust}(1871-1922) was a French novelist,critic and essayist.Also according to this quote he was a keen exponent of food and the experiences relating to such.

Quote:" When from a long distant past nothing subsists,after people are dead,after things are broken and scattered,still alone more fragile,but with more vitality,more unsubstantial,more persistent,more faithful,the smell and taste of things remain poised for a long time,like souls,ready to remind us,waiting and hoping for their moment,amid the ruins of all the rest,and bear unfaltering....the vast structure of recollection."              

The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly.

Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News & Views

Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Saturday, September 8, 2012

The Most Vital Ingredient:Quote of the Day:Kathy Lette

Today's quote comes from Kathy Lette newspaper columnist and author of sit-coms she write this quote of the day, explaining that the most important ingredient is people!

Quote of the Day:Courtesy of Kathy Lette
" ....planning a brilliant menu and preparing it beautifully does not guarantee a recipe for success.It is pointless giving painstaking thought to food,if you have not given food to thought.
The truth is people are the most important ingredient."  

The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly.
Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News & Views by leaving a comment.
Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Thursday, September 6, 2012

With Appreciation of Good Food:Quote of the Day

Socrates: " Bad men live to eat and drink,whereas good men eat and drink in order to live."

Socrates:(469-369 BC)

The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly.

Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News & Views
Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

A Little And When Needed-Mahatma Gandi

Quote of the Day: Today's quote of the day is from and courtesy of Mahatma Gandhi as we know him but real name [ Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948)]and is about less not more!

In a world where you read about banks like Barclay's making £500 million from betting on food prices and Glencore adding to the misery of others by forcing up the prices,with words like " We will make a killing out of food prices." It so nice to read a simple and enigmatic quote from a humble man.

Quote: 
"It is wonderful if we choose the right diet,what an extraordinarily small quantity would suffice". 

Simple and humble as the man who was born in Gujarat and trained in law in London, to one day become a great leader just by using techniques of " non-violent disobedience" in a world of violence chaos and disorder.His aim was not for himself to become self effacing or an idol of any civilisation but simply to provide freedom for the oppressed and down trodden!Not a lot has changed since his day and all we can do is hope and pray for a better future for all people,not just the ones in so-called power!

The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly.

Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News & Views

 Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Saturday, September 1, 2012

Quote of the Day:Good Cooking Comes First

Courtesy of:Owen Meredith {Edward Robert Bulwer-Lytton}-(1833-1891)  

We may live without poetry,music and art;
We may live without conscience and live without heart;
We may live without friends,we may live without books;
But civilised man cannot live without cooks.      

The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly.
Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News & Views Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Friday, August 31, 2012

Quote of the Day: Marie-Antoine Carême-King of Chefs

Marie Antoine (Antonin[1]) Carême (pronounced: [maʁi ɑ̃twan kaʁɛm]) (8 June 1784–12 January 1833), known as the "King of Chefs, and the Chef of Kings"was an early practitioner and exponent of the elaborate style of cooking known as haute cuisine the "high art" of French cooking: a grandiose style of cookery favored by both international royalty and by the newly rich of Paris. Carême is often considered as one of the first internationally renowned celebrity chefs.

Quote:" When we no longer have good cooking in the world,we will have no literature,nor high and sharp intelligence, nor friendly gatherings,nor social harmony" 

Extract Courtesy of:Larousse Gastronomique Version 1961 my book of learning to become a Chef! 
  
Care^me prefaced his own formulation of modern menus with a treatise on ancient cookery which required a great deal of research and which bears witnessed to a devoted passion for his profession.
There is nothing stranger as a menu of a dinner unearthed by Care^me which was served in 1745 to Louis XV by He^liot,the Dauphine's 'deceyur ordinaire de la bouche'.This dinner consisted entirely of beef!From the ungarnished soup made with shin of beef to the brain fritters served with lemon juice,nothing but this common-or-garden animal featured on the monarch's table.Care^me recalls that one of the Marshall Davoust's cooks prepared a dinner consisting entirely of horse-meat, during the long siege of Hamburg,of which Davoust was the governor.But he adds that necessity forced him to pass,for which he deserved praise,whereas the Dauphine's chef,author of deplorable menu,was merely an ignorant and mediocre person.
        
The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly. Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News & Views Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Egg Cutlets - Ministry of Food - Eating for Victory

Today l thought l would provide a recipe for the next of my " Dried Eggs Recipes" by showing the versatility of the humble egg! This one is called simply "Egg Cutlets" and consists of using vegetables and oatmeal as the main ingredients.

EGG CUTLETS:
Ingredients:
1 and a half pounds of mixed cooked vegetables [l would suggest Al dente to retain flavour] finally chopped:      
1 and a half ounces of oatmeal:
4 dried eggs in powder form:
Salt and pepper to taste:
Method:
Mix all ingredients together:
Heat a little fat in a frying pan until smoking hot and fry spoonsful of the mixture until golden brown all over:
Serve sprinkled with chopped parsley:
[Sufficient for 4]
  

The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly. Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News & Views Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Quote of the Day:Keith Floyd

This is one of my favourite chefs of all time affable and agreeable and plenty of Bonn Ami to go around. So this quote is a kind of tribute to a great chef and a great man.
Keith Floyd (28 December 1943 – 14 September 2009

Quote:"A home is a place where a pot of fresh soup simmers gently on the hob,filling the kitchen with soft aromas....and filling your heart, and later your tummy with joy"

Just about sums up the man and tells us a lot about the chef. God Bless Keith from one chef to another.        

The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly. Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News & Views Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Lifes Great Pleasure - Quote of the Day

" If a man be sensible and one fine morning while he is lying in bed,count at the tips of his fingers how many things in this life will truly give him enjoyment, invariably he will find food is the first one"

Courtesy of: Lin Yutang {1895-1976}

The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly. Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email News & Views

Thank you, Chris [Chef]

Ministry of Food - Dried Eggs - Rationing Remembered

I thought it was about time l started to put on at least a weekly post about my understanding of food and my research through books and l have many! This will include the types of food's we have eaten during the war when times of austerity was even then in existence. Even though they we moan and groan since those days we have never had it so good!

So l thought l would start with a staple food at the time simply " Dried Eggs" or powered or dehydrated eggs...and colloquially during the period of rationing in the UK, as “Ersatz eggs”. and their uses in various types of meals.
   
The Ministry of Food: explains this very well....dried egg is pure fresh egg with no additions, and nothing but the moisture taken away. it is pure egg, spray dried.

Eggs: provided a very highly concentrated form of food as they contain first class body building material.they also help us to resist colds and other infection because of their high protective properties.They are easily digested and for this reason are especially good for children and invalids.

Dried Eggs: are just as good as fresh eggs and should be used in the same way! They are very good for main dishes.
Before l move onto recipes and dishes l thought l would just explain how the housewife of the day, would reconstitute dried egg.

HOW TO RECONSTITUTE DRIED EGG: 
Ingredients:
1 level tablespoonful of egg powder
2 level tablespoons of water
[This is equal to one egg}
Methods:
1. Mix the egg and water and allow to stand for about 5 minutes, until the powder has absorbed the moisture.Then work out any lumps with a wooden spoon, finally beating with a fork or whisk.
or:
2. Mix egg to a smooth paste with half the water.beat until lumps have been removed, add the remaining water and beat again.
or:
3. For plain cakes, puddings and batters etc....the eggs can be added dry and mixed with the other dry ingredients. When adding the liquid to the mixture an additional 2 tablespoons of per dried egg used must be allowed.
Use At Once:
After reconstituting the egg use at once.Do not reconstitute more egg than necessary for immediate use!
Method of Cooking:
Use in recipes exactly as fresh eggs, beating as usual before adding to other ingredients.
Storage:
Keep the egg powder in a tin with a tight fitting lid and store in a cool place.Do not: keep dried egg in a refrigerator.                      

Recipes: here are some recipes for a variety of appetising dishes in place of meat,fish or cheese {that was in short supply during the war} and which is particularly suited for dried egg.

The first recipe l thought l would put on with others to follow later is a simply dish everyone who cooks has tried at one time or another is:
BACON AND EGG PIE:
Ingredients:          
2 eggs {reconstituted}:
2 rashers of grilled bacon:
8oz potato pastry:
2 oz mashed potato:
Salt and Pepper {to taste}
Method:
Beat the eggs:
Line a plate with half the pastry:
Mix the egg,potato,salt,pepper and chopped bacon together:
Pout the mixture onto the plate and cover with the the rest of the pastry:
Bake in a moderate oven for 1/2 hour:
Serve hot with vegetables or cold with salad: {Sufficient for 4 people}

Recipe courtesy of: War Cookery Leaflet 11                                  
Extract taken from: Eating for Victory      

The posts l provide are my views of good recipes and also are shared from a number of contacts, news and blogging services. They are not always tried and tested by me unless it states that l have cooked any myself,whereby it will be noted on the post accordingly. Please tweet at #AceFoodNews or email        News & Views Please leave your comments and l will post them, any recipes related to subject just mark                             " Ministry of Food " and send them to me by clicking the News & Views link.

Happy cooking and will post more very soon.

Thank you, Chris [Chef]